Teens and Money – 4 Websites Teaching Financial Literacy

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Are you able to teach your teens to be financially literate? It isn’t always easy as not all parents are fully financially literate themselves. And even for those parents that are, it is not an easy topic to explain or teach. Since I am certainly no expert (my accounting and law degrees have not been used in many, many years), I have looked elsewhere for advice to share with you.

Here are 4 websites, experts or articles offering help and advice on financial literacy to parents and/or teens that you can use to have a conversation about personal finance and the things that they need to know to be financially literate:

1. Think Like a Kid, by Janet Bodnar, Editor, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance – What kids want and need to know about money and resources that will help capture their attention.

2. The Mint – A partnership between the National Council on Economic Education and the Northwestern Mutual Foundation launched the Mint organization to help parents teach children to manage money wisely and develop good financial habits. The website has four different sections, fun for kids, tips for teens, pointers for parents and ideas for teachers.

3. 360 degrees of Financial Literacy – A website from the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants to help Americans understand their personal finances through every stage of life. On the How to Talk to Your Children About Money page, you will find various articles about teaching teens or children about money, stocks, summer salaries, etc.

4. Manage Your Money, Junior Achievement Student Center – American Express has partnered with Junior Achievement to help its teen and young adult PASS Cardmembers learn money management and financial responsibility. There is a direct link to this website from the American Express PASS Money 101 page. After reading through the website and learning about paychecks, credit, investing, etc., teens can then go on to pass the JA Financial Assessment Test and earn a certificate of financial literacy from Junior Achievement.

I hope that I have given you some tools to help discuss financial literacy with your teens and some tools for them to use themselves. For more information on the PASS card for your teen or young adult, go to the American Express PASS website.

Full disclosure: I am working with American Express on this series of blog posts about the PASS card and I am being paid for my writing. However, my son is using the card and everything I write about our experiences is authentic and my thoughts on the program are real.

See also:  
Teenagers and Money – Teaching Budgeting
Teenagers and Money – Most Important Lesson to Share?
Teens and Money: Help for Parents with The Money Talk 
Teens and Money – What about Allowance? 
Teens and Money – Understanding Needs vs. Wants 
Teens and Money – Cash, Credit or Debit Cards?

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