2 Essential Books for Parents of Teenagers

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It isn’t easy raising teenagers. We get by with help from friends, common sense, and maybe some online advice. However, there are some areas that we need the advice of experts. Here are two books that give us needed advice that can help us with teens; one in the area cyberlaw and the other in adolescent psychology.

Cybertraps for the Young

Everywhere you look, you see another article or book warning you about the dangers of technology for your kids and teens.Cybertraps for the Young is not that book. In Cybertraps, attorney Frederick S. Lane warns parents about the potential legal dangers your teenagers are exposing themselves to when they think they are doing nothing more than sending simple texts or publishing articles.

“The real problems arise with the three C’s of technology: communication, capability, and convergence. More and more often, we’re handing our children remarkably powerful devices long before they have the wisdom or maturity to understand the consequences of misusing them.”

There is a great deal that parents need to know about the laws relating privacy, copyright, plagiarism, harassment, cyberbullying, hacking, obscenity, sexting and more. Cybertraps for the Young will see you through everything you might possibly need to know in very easy to understand language.

The book is organized into 4 Parts:

  1. The Technology – This is where Lane explains all of the technologies that teens use and all of their methods of communication. Very tech savvy parents can probably either skip or skim this section.
  2. The Cybertraps – The chapters in this part are the real meat of the book. This is where you will learn for possible legal problems that your teens can fall into and the implications.
  3. The Solutions – Don’t worry, there are many, which include, first and foremost, don’t stop educating yourself.
  4. Resources and Tools – This includes a guide to Electronic Monitoring Software, a glossary, and a brief guide to online safety resources.

Cybertraps for the Young takes the approach of the worst case scenario. However you need somebody to point out to you might happen when your teens (or even you) do certain things, even if they are not very likely to happen. Technology is changing rapidly and the law cannot keep up with it and right now judges often have to decide cases without concrete guidance. Anything can happen. Be prepared.

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Child and Adolescent Psychology

This is the book that you wish you had if you ever took a course in psychology. You will still learn everything, but in a more interesting, easier and quicker read.

Not only are there sections for different age groups, of which I was only interested in the 12-18, but there are also chapters on mental disorders, learning disorders, the digital child, family therapy and more. There are many helpful resources and a glossary in the back of the book.

We need to understand the psychology of teenagers, because if we do, we won’t get as angry at them and will be able to help them when they do something wrong. You will read that teens brains are physically wired so that strong emotion gets in the way of logic and reason throughout their teenage years. This is why they are impulsive and make immature judgments. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Child and Adolescent Psychology is here to help.

Understand your teenagers and the potential psychological problems and cybertraps that they may fall into.

See also:
It’s Complicated: Must Read Book on Socially Networked Teens

Creating Innovators – What Parents Can Do
Bullying: 2 New Books Offer Help
Unique Advice Book For Moms of Teenage Daughters

Disclosure: I received a free print copy of one book and an electronic galley of the other to review.

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